• S2T

     

    IF YOU ARE IN NEED OF RESOURCES FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING ISSUES, PLEASE VISIT YOUR COUNSELOR FOR MORE INFORMATION.

    • anger management
    • child abuse/neglect
    • depression and other mental health issues
    • domestic violence
    • drugs/alcohol
    • eating disorders
    • grief and loss
    • mentoring
    • peer pressure
    • pregnancy
    • relationships
    • self-esteem
    • self-harm
    • sexual assault
    • stress management
    • suicide

    WHEN DOES MY CHILD NEED HELP?

    Parents are usually the first to recognize that their child has a problem with emotions or behavior.  Still, the decision to seek help can be difficult and painful for a parent. The first step is to gently try to talk to the child.  An honest, open talk about feelings can often help. Parents may choose to consult with the child's physicians, teachers, school counselor, members of the clergy or other adults who know the child well.

    Some signs that your teen may need help are:

    • Marked change in school performance.
    • Inability to cope with problems and daily activities.
    • Marked changes in sleeping and/or eating habits.
    • Many physical complaints.
    • Sexual acting out.
    • Depression shown by sustained, prolonged negative mood and attitude, often accompanied by poor appetite, difficulty sleeping or thoughts of death.
    • Abuse of alcohol and/or drugs.
    • Intense fear of becoming obese with no relationship to actual body weight, purging food or restricting eating.
    • Persistent nightmares.
    • Threats of self-harm or harm to others.
    • Self-injury or self-destructive behavior.
    • Frequent outbursts of anger, aggression.
    • Threatens to run away.
    • Aggressive or non-aggressive consistent violation of rights of others; opposition to authority, truancy, thefts, or vandalism.
    • Strange thoughts and feelings; and unusual behaviors.

    SUICIDE RESOURCES

    For Emergencies Dial 911

    Other Resources

    • Northrange Behavioral Health Crisis #: (970) 347-2120
    • National Suicide Hotline: 1-800-784-2433
    • Suicide Education and Support Services (SESS): 970.313.1089
    • National Suicide Hotline: 800.273.TALK (8255)

     

    NRBH

     

    What Can You Do to Help Someone You Think Might Be Suicidal?

    Listen to what they have to say:

    • Don’t make judgments
    • Allow the person to talk and tell their story
    • Offer support, empathy, and compassion

    Try to ask questions and get a feel for how the person is feeling:

    • Is the person having suicidal thoughts?
    • Is the person thinking of committing suicide?
    • Do they have a plan?
    • Ask questions that are honest, direct, and to the point.
    • Don’t agree to keep secrets.
    • Try to remain calm and avoid appearing alarmed.

    Take Action:

    • Seek professional help: Call 911 in an emergency and the suicide hotline for further assistance: 1-(800) 273-TALK (8255)
    • Do not leave the individual alone and remove any potential weapons or items the person may use to harm themselves.
    • Don’t promise false statements of home and let the person know there are other options available to them.
    • Help the person make an appointment for treatment and follow up that appointment was scheduled.

    Alcohol & Drug Abuse:

    Alcohol & Drug Abuse Hotline: 1-800-252-6465 (ALCOHOL)

     

    Community Resources